magnolia crunch

Delighted by the popularity of our not-too-sweet but very seedy beet your heart out granola (made with gluten-free organic oats), we set out to create an entirely grain-free alternative that was equally crunchy and packed with protein and healthy fats to fuel you for hours. After some of the standard trial and error, we created something that, I think, is even better than the original.

ingredients: organic large flaked coconut, organic pumpkin seeds, locally grown beets, organic dates, organic sunflower seeds, organic raisins, organic chia seeds, organic locally grown carrots, organic golden flax, filtered water, organic virgin coconut oil, organic tapioca flour, organic cinnamon, organic ginger, himalayan pink salt, lemon extract, vanilla extract

good neighbors & nutrient density

I’ve been so preoccupied in the last few weeks with a) scrambling to catch up with spring in our slacker vegetable garden and b) brainstorming logistics for my pilot subscription program this summer, that I’ve been lax with posting recipes on the site. Though most of my recent experiments in the kitchen have yielded success (flavor, toddler appeal, proper mouthfeel, etc.), others left me questioning myself not only as a baker, but as a competent adult: a crumbly fail of what I intended to be a chewy nutrient bar (not photographed because my hands were too coated in chia seeds, dehydrated kale, and tears to operate my phone’s camera); and a whole sheet of deliciously sweet quinoa beet crackers which ended up in the compost bin, charred and black, after I decided to “crisp them up” really quickly in the oven. Long story. In any case, I look forward to bringing my newer secret recipes to scale. After taking samples around to my favorite vendors at the farmers market, Caromont Farm is interested in replacing her Carr’s crackers with some of mine for her cheese samples. Baby steps!

As the streets of Baltimore (home to some of my closest family) erupted with misplaced frustration about persistent economic disparities, I came home Tuesday last week to find a surprise wedged between our screen and front door. A leaky red box of imported cocoa powder, aside an unopened box of Whole Foods’ 365 brand “Quack’n Bites.” The kind my kid recognizes inexplicably and steals from other kid’s snack bags as I sigh disapprovingly (is there a gene for brand recognition, somehow?). I hid the box in the darker part of the pantry until I could regift it again to someone more appreciative.

I didn’t need to ask who left these items, for two reasons. First, our next door neighbors had already made clear that they “don’t eat organic,” quick to bring over any cereal branded to vaguely convey health properties, whether or not they had an organic label. I was told, at one point, that they “don’t eat that healthy stuff, honey.”

They are kind, generous people living in a small one story concrete house, patient with a landlord that seems to ignore nearly every aspect of maintenance. They mow their grass with a regularity that puts us to shame. Raising their 5 year old grandson, they receive some public assistance (I think), and get food donations every once in a while. When deer season comes and they get lucky, you can bet our freezer gets stocked, too, especially if I’m willing to help process the bigger cuts. Reciprocation is impossible– when we still had chickens, they persistently refused offers of eggs. “We don’t eat them rich brown eggs.” I tried meekly to share some local apples once, and it was only (after my third attempt at persuasion) that the boss (mom) of the house finally conceded they might be good fried with pork chops. I considered it a huge success that they reluctantly accepted a pre-made meal of plain pasta with sauce and cheese this past weekend as a thank you for the cocoa and crackers. I felt like I was acting out some kind of sketch comedy, standing in their smoky doorway trying to “sell” something so plain and inoffensive. Secondly, I deduced the gifter because the boxes reeked of cigarette smoke, as anything would after 30 seconds or more of exposure to their interior atmosphere.

While our opaque recycling bin hides wine bottles, theirs hides cans of Mountain Dew. They shun organic for their own reasons, as I seemed to snub the Quackers for my own.

As days went by, the whole situation bugged me. I didn’t share a skepticism about organic foods, so what could I possibly have against innocuous goldfish crackers (even their overpriced organic equivalents)? Did I just resent major retailers’ lucrative attempts to “organic-wash” what was essentially junk food? Had I turned into a party-pooping, home-baking snob, or worse– a proselytizing (and hypocritical) dietary zealot? After all, red wine is about as empty in calories as Mountain Dew.

So I snuck into the pantry and looked more closely at ingredient and nutrition label:

  • 17+ ingredients (the top three by weight being white (organic) flour, vegetable oil, and natural cheddar cheese flavor)
  • 130 calories for a 68 cracker serving
  • 21 grams of carbohydrate (only 1 being dietary fiber, 0 grams sugar)
  • 2% each of daily values of Vitamin A, Calcium, and Iron
  • Despite a seal on the front (designed, I’m sure to cue the sensation of authenticity) which claimed inclusion of “Real Organic Cheddar Cheese,” said cheese came AFTER salt, by weight, on the list of ingredients, right before paprika

That pretty much validated my assumptions, though, in the poor Quack’n Bites’ defense, there were no added sugars. I guess I’m not the only party-pooper, though: Quack’n Bites earned a C grade on Fooducate, a rating web site on which “minimally processed, real foods with intrinsic nutrients will score better than processed foods that are poor in built-in nutrients.”

I compared the Quack’n Bites’ nutrition label with one of my newer kitchen inventions, for which I used my new best friend, Recipal. It generates nutrition labels for recipes (a function it performs much more expertly than a lot of the free versions out there, which I’ve also tried). It. is. awesome. And I swear they are not paying me to say so.

Curried Sweet Potato & Flax Crackers are one of my simpler recipes, grain-free and packed with baked organic sweet potatoes and golden flax seeds. First of all, even your toddler can probably pronounce the ingredients, and the vitamin content is much higher, with more protein and fats (mostly omega 3s), less sodium, and more than 50% fewer carbohydrates.  And, somehow, ten 1.5 inch square crackers have 20 fewer calories than the 68 Quack n’ Bites, though their serving weight is identical. This is a classic case of nutrient density, which is going to be the next drumbeat coming from dieticians, many of whom are advocating for a standardized “nutrient density score” to help people make better decisions about how to “spend” their calories. Ironically, Whole Foods has an Aggregated Nutrient Density Score (ANDI) on their web site (as does the CDC, and DrFuhrman.com, among others). Keep in mind that any “ranking” rubric is misleading, since EVERY food has some unique nutritional properties, and the less domesticated versions of crops tend to have more beneficial phytochemicals (as Jo Robinson’s Eating on the Wild Side explains in detail). Watercress scores more highly than sweet potatoes in CDC’s scoring, for example, but if I’m interested in getting more Vitamin A, you can bet I will opt for the latter. It depends on what nutrients that matter to you; and whether you trust pill vitamins to make up for the nutrients lacking on the plate.

Party-poopery aside, it comes down to this: I don’t resent empty calories (hey– we all have our vices), but I reserve the right to resent empty calories that are mass-produced, over-packaged, and branded to convey wholesomeness to busy parents who don’t have time to scrutinize nutrition labels in the store aisle. This reminder, after a week of aforementioned “ooopses” in the kitchen, is enough to keep me moving forward with a mission to make nutrient-dense snacks that are tasty enough for kids and grown-ups alike. When it comes to feeding children with developing brains– and with, like mine, an impatience for seated mealtime, I don’t want “cheese” crackers to be my only healthy option for food on the go. Until my guy is old enough to wield the power of consumer choice on his own, I will not let snack-time be wasted.

Oscar the Grouch Cookies

He loves cold weather, stinky things, and loud noises. Who better to celebrate the transition from February to March than Oscar the Grouch? Fur matted with please-I don’t even-want-to-know, is he really not such a bad guy? If you don’t fully appreciate the contrarian that is Oscar, then you can call these Crocodile Nuggets.

If you are familiar with baking using sunflower butter or meal (I wasn’t), then you are probably well aware of the emerald result when chlorogenic acid reacts with baking soda. Chlorogenic acid is present in the stems and leaves of most plants, but peculiarly also in the seeds of sunflowers. This cookie takes advantage of it!

I am going to continuing playing around with this recipe to enhance it. I learned a valuable lesson in the course of modifying the original recipe, which is that sometimes, I need to leave well enough alone. I tried my hand at Against All Alligator Surprise Cookies_InsideGrain’s N’Oatmeal Raisin St. Patrick’s Day Cookies, and ended up with something soft, creamy, sweet and delicious, in addition to being bright green on the inside (see photo to the right). Then I decided that if it was going to be green anyway, wasn’t it disingenuous to NOT contain some kind of leafy vegetable?  I tried a version with spinach, then with chard. They were equally delicious, but a less vibrant green throughout. The recipe below includes that veggie infusion, but as you can see, the cookies are a dimmer, “Oscar” shade of green throughout, even textured a bit like his fur. Still surprisingly creamy and moist. If you want a version that is deceivingly brown and cookie-like on the outside and bright green on the inside, though, go with the Against All Grain recipe.  I will update this if I can manage to retain the emerald illusion WITH the greens.

 

Oscar the Grouch Cookies
Yields 12
These nuggets are better than they look. Due to the reaction between baking soda and the chlorogenic acid in sunflower seeds, the interior of these cookies will turn green after cooling, which makes for a nice surprise for kids. The sunbutter makes them creamy and just sweet enough.
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Cook Time
16 min
Cook Time
16 min
170 calories
23 g
16 g
8 g
3 g
2 g
67 g
124 g
17 g
0 g
6 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
67g
Yields
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 71
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 8g
13%
Saturated Fat 2g
9%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 16mg
5%
Sodium 124mg
5%
Total Carbohydrates 23g
8%
Dietary Fiber 3g
12%
Sugars 17g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
5%
Vitamin C
3%
Calcium
3%
Iron
6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 large egg
  2. 3 tablespoons hot water
  3. ½ cup unsweetened sunbutter
  4. 6 medium pitted dates
  5. ½ apple, with skin
  6. 3/4 cup chopped spinach (about 1/3 cup purée)
  7. 1 tablespoon honey
  8. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  9. ½ cup finely shredded coconut
  10. ¼ cup coconut flour
  11. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  12. 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  13. 1 teaspoon baking soda
  14. 1/3 cup dried currants
  15. 1/4 cup pepitas
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Place the halved, pitted dates into a glass or metal measuring cup and pack down. Add the hot water and let sit 5 minutes.
  3. Combine the egg, sunbutter, greens, applesauce, vanilla extract, and dates (with their liquid) in a food processor. Process for about a minute until smooth.
  4. In medium bowl, measure out and combine the coconut, coconut flour, ground flax, arrowroot flour, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt. Stir until fully incorporated.
  5. Add the purée mixture to the dry ingredients and stir thoroughly to combine.
  6. Add the currants and stir to incorporate. Let the mixture sit just a couple minutes so the coconut flour can absorb a little of the moisture.
  7. Drop spoonfuls of dough onto a greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Each cookie should be about 2-3 bites in size. Gently flatten tops of cookies with a spatula. Add a few sunflower seeds to the top of each cookie for decoration.
  8. Bake for 16 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack. Cookies will turn green once cooled and will continue to get a deeper green after 2 hours.
Notes
  1. This makes between 24-26 "three bite" cookies. The nutritional information assumes a toddler serving of 2 cookies.
Adapted from Against All Grain
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calories
170
fat
8g
protein
3g
carbs
23g
more
Adapted from Against All Grain
https://goodphytefoods.com/

A Funeral for a Deflated Pumpkin

If you happen to know anyone buried at Arlington National Cemetery, then you know that part of the “honor” is a long, long line.  Loved ones in mourning wait months between death and the ceremonial funeral to actually take place.  In that spirit (or one of utter laziness), I let our uncarved autumn pumpkin slowly rot for nearly four months on the front stoop. Every time I walked in and out of the house, I would think, “I really need to do something about that thing. It’s hideous.  The next rain will reduce it to an organgelatinous (wow; I just made a word!) slurry on which to slip and break my hip.”  I don’t always think in rhyme, but something about the sunshine on this February afternoon but a spring in my step, and I finally got around to giving our once festive-and-contextual pumpkin a proper funeral.  By that I mean that I gingerly lifted it by its soft underbelly, plopped it in a bucket, and walked it around back to the compost pile, where I proceeded to eviscerate it aggressively, scooping the seeds from the somehow-still-bright-orange innards. The yield was commendable, and I patted my now-stained hands on my back at my resourcefulness.

If you’ve looked at more than a couple of the recipes on this site, you know that I love pumpkins. If anyone loves her beta carotene, it’s me, and I hoard our garden’s butternut in the basement until April, breaking one or two out for a special occasion, when I’m sick of sweet potatoes, or kubochas (my favorite) are hard to find. Kubochas have a dense, dry flesh which, even after fully baked, will hold into cubes for inclusion in a frittata without getting all sloppy, as a butternut can do.  Seminole pumpkins (a recent staple in our house) are somewhere between a Kubocha and a butternut. But I digress. Decorative pumpkins, on the other hand, have a generally insipid flesh, and aren’t really worth eating. But I was determined to salvage something of the sad little guy, and set about toasting the seeds. After rinsing a couple times, letting soak in saltwater an hour, and then draining before spreading on a baking pan covered in melted coconut oil, a little more coarse sea salt, black pepper, and chipotle poweder, I put them in the toaster oven (on 400F), and scuttled back to my computer. It is a work day, after all.

Wouldn’t you know? 400F was too high, and 15 minutes too long.  If I had to do it all over? I would have added some sage leaves, kept the temperature to 350F, and gotten off my butt to check and turn them after 10 minutes.  At least the worms in the compost bin will get a proper feast fitting of a wake.

 

Kale & Apple Roll-ups with Quinoa & Flax

Most fruit/veggie roll-ups (yes, even the organic ones with “feel-good” branding) have fruit or vegetable juice concentrates or extracts, not to mention liquid sweeteners and added pectin. By comparison, these kale roll-ups are simple, sweetened only with whole local apples, loaded with fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, and protein.

Kale & Apple Roll-ups with Quinoa & Flax
Serves 8
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Prep Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
75 calories
12 g
0 g
3 g
2 g
0 g
71 g
8 g
4 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
71g
Servings
8
Amount Per Serving
Calories 75
Calories from Fat 23
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 3g
4%
Saturated Fat 0g
1%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 8mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 12g
4%
Dietary Fiber 3g
12%
Sugars 4g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A
39%
Vitamin C
35%
Calcium
4%
Iron
4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups fresh lacinato kale leaves, packed
  2. 1 1/2 medium apples, cored
  3. 1/4 cup flax seeds
  4. 1/4 cup cooked quinoa
  5. 1/2 peeled orange
  6. 3 tablespoons water
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. I use a Nutribullet, and this fills it up to the brim.
  2. Spread the puree evenly on a 14” by 14” silpat baking sheet or parchment paper.
  3. Pour the mixture onto the sheet and use a rubber spatula to evenly spread the mix from one corner to the other, somewhere between 1/8 and 1/4 inch thick. Get it as smooth and even as possible, erring on the side of making the edges just slightly thicker than the center.
  4. Place in dehydrator and dry at 135°F or 57°C for about 3 hours (maybe longer in humid conditions).
  5. To test for doneness, press the leather lightly with flat fingers. If your finger leaves an indentation, it is not ready. If the leather feels moist or sticky, it is not ready. It will be slightly tacky, but it should not feel wet at all. If it pulls off the paper easily, it is done. If parts stick to the sheet (which is more likely at the center), it is not done. Look for color variations, wet spots may be much lighter or much darker in color.
  6. If it is dry and brittle, it is too dry, but it makes a nice crunchy "chip."
Notes
  1. Spinach or other mild greens can be substituted for the kale, and chia or other seeds can substitute for the quinoa, if you want a "grain free" version.
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calories
75
fat
3g
protein
2g
carbs
12g
more
https://goodphytefoods.com/

Sweet Potato Sesame Sticks

Convinced that those addictive sesame sticks in the bulk bins can’t be thaaaat hard to make (the ingredients are simple), I tried my hand at a whole wheat version from Serious Eats, trying to emulate the real thing. I subbed beet water (the magenta liquid left over from steaming beets) for the water, and added cayenne.

They were good, and Fionn loved them, but I needed to kick them up a notch: they needed more vegetable content, more seed fat/fiber. So I made this grain-free, paleo version with sweet potato. I look forward to making versions with other pureed vegetables. NOTE: Cumin is KEY!

Sweet Potato Sesame Sticks
Yields 16
Savory, crunchy, and full of omega 3s and beta carotene.
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141 calories
7 g
0 g
12 g
4 g
1 g
31 g
231 g
1 g
0 g
10 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
31g
Yields
16
Amount Per Serving
Calories 141
Calories from Fat 99
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 12g
18%
Saturated Fat 1g
7%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 7g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 231mg
10%
Total Carbohydrates 7g
2%
Dietary Fiber 5g
19%
Sugars 1g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
24%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
8%
Iron
9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/4 cup ground golden flax seed
  2. 1/2 cup toasted sesame seeds
  3. 2 tablespoons hemp seeds
  4. 1/4 teaspoon dried turmeric
  5. 1/4 teaspoon cumin powder
  6. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  7. 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  8. 4 tablespoons sesame oil
  9. 1 cup puréed sweet potato or pumpkin
Instructions
  1. Combine sesame seeds, hemp seeds,ground flax, turmeric, garlic powder, cumin, and salt in a medium bowl and whisk thoroughly to combine.
  2. In a small bowl, combine pureed sweet potato/pumpkin and oil. Stir these wet ingredients into dry ingredients. Combine thoroughly, kneading any remaining bits into the dough by hand. If too dry, add a teaspoon or so of water.
  3. Divide dough in half and shape each into a ball. Place both balls on a large sheet of parchment paper (big enough to cover a cookie sheet) and flatten each into 1 inch-thick square. You may find it helpful to refrigerate for 30 minutes to allow dough to firm up before rolling. Once dough has chilled, heat oven to 350°F.
  4. Working with one ball at a time, roll out one ball of dough on the parchment paper to 1/8-inch thickness and, using a knife or pizza wheel, cut into small rectangles (I made mine approximately 1/4-inch by 1-inch, but you can go with a narrower rectangle more akin to the store-bought version). Uniformity is important to assure even baking.
  5. Once cut, separate the pieces on the parchment-lined baking sheet so that they are at least 1/2 inch apart.
  6. Bake for 10 minutes, then flip the pieces around on the sheet so that the bottoms don't brown. Continue baking for 8 minutes more, until sticks are crisp but not browning. Remove from oven and cool completely before storing in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. Yields 4 cups, or about 150 1 x 1.5 inch crackers.
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calories
141
fat
12g
protein
4g
carbs
7g
more
https://goodphytefoods.com/

Black Bean Energy Bars

These are a great standby for the lunch box or snack bag, and are completely adaptable. Baked apples or other soft fruit can substitute for the peach, and avocado, seed/nut butter, or any other “binder” can substitute for the butternut squash. Have fun, and let me know how you tweak this recipe!

Ingredients
1 ½ cup cooked black beans
1/2 cup cooked butternut squash
¼ cup honey
¼ cup ripe peach
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
1 teaspoon of cinnamon
¼ teaspoon sea salt
1 1/2 cups of oats
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup ground flax seed
1/4 cup chia
1/4 cup dried figs, sliced
1/2 cup sunflower seeds

Instructions
In a food processor, combine beans, squash, honey, peach, extract, spice, and salt until smooth. Add the oats and dry base ingredients and pulse just to combine. Add stir-ins and pulse again just to combine. It should be a spreadable consistency. If it’s too dry, add 1/4 cup of water; if it’s too runny, add an additional 1/4 cup of oats.

Grease 13×9 pan with 1 tablespoon oil, then spread mixture into pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-18 minutes. Once cooled, slice into 16-18 bars, depending on your size preference.

Nutrition Information
These bars are low in cholesterol and sodium, while being a good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin A, magnesium and phosphorus; and a very good source of Manganese. Estimated Glycemic Load: 12. Click here for complete nutritional details for this recipe.

Rosemary Raisin Biscuits with Kale

Are you raising your eyebrows at the idea of a marriage between rosemary and raisins? Trust me on this one. The original inspiration for these came from Paleo Magazine cracker recipe, and I made a couple minor adaptations to incorporate raw leafy greens. For Charlottesvillians, I prefer to get as much of my kale, chard, and collards from Whisper Hill Farm, which has a knack for growing gigantic, gorgeous greens organically. Check them out at City Market. I tend to roll mine out a little thicker than the recommended 1/8-inch, so the insides remain a little soft (“biscuity,” if you will). Be sure to keep them less than 1/4-inch thick, even if you go this route.

Rosemary Raisin Biscuits
Yields 12
The raisins make this slightly sweet, combining surprisingly well with the rosemary. These can be made pretty quickly in the oven, no dehydrator is needed. Make about 48 1 x 2 inch biscuits, with the nutritional information below presuming about 4 per kiddo serving.
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Total Time
17 min
Total Time
17 min
130 calories
14 g
0 g
7 g
4 g
1 g
32 g
104 g
6 g
0 g
7 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
32g
Yields
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 130
Calories from Fat 62
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 7g
11%
Saturated Fat 1g
4%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 5g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 104mg
4%
Total Carbohydrates 14g
5%
Dietary Fiber 4g
17%
Sugars 6g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
9%
Vitamin C
6%
Calcium
5%
Iron
7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3/4 loosely packed cup of raisins
  2. 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  3. 1/2 cup flax seeds
  4. 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds
  5. 1/2 cup finely chopped lacinato kale
  6. 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
  7. generous 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  8. 2 tablespoons raw sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Place the raisins in a small bowl and cover with hot water. Set aside to soak for 10 minutes.
  2. In a food processor fitted with a steel blade, process the sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, kale, rosemary, and sea salt until finely ground, about 30 seconds.
  3. Drain the raisins, reserving 2 tablespoons of the soaking liquid. Add the raisins to the food processor along with the sesame seeds. Pulse until the raisins are reduced to small flecks and are incorporated into the seed mixture.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of the reserved water and process until a rough dough forms. The dough should hold together when pinched between your fingers. If it does not, add a little bit of the remaining reserved water at a time, to achieve the right texture.
  5. Transfer the dough to the center of a large piece of parchment paper, folding one side over the other and using a rolling pin to roll out the dough to about 1/8-inch thickness.
  6. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and trim any jagged edges with a knife or pizza cutter.
  7. Transfer the dough, parchment paper and all, to a baking sheet. Use the pizza cutter to cut the dough into 1 x 2 inch square cracker shapes. Bake for 12 minutes.
  8. Remove the pan from the oven and separate the crackers with a spatula along the precut lines, spacing them out a little bit on the baking sheet so the air can circulate around them. Place the pan back in the oven for 5 minutes. This step helps to crisp up the crackers.
  9. Remove the crackers from the oven and cool completely, as the crackers will continue to crisp up as they cool. Store in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. Nutritional information: Low in Cholesterol, these muffins are a good source of Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Vitamin K and Manganese. Click here for a complete nutritional profile.
Adapted from Paleo Magazine
beta
calories
130
fat
7g
protein
4g
carbs
14g
more
Adapted from Paleo Magazine
https://goodphytefoods.com/