sesame zuccumin crackers

Last week at the market (August 1), a palate-savvy young customer asked if I made anything with sesame. Though I do have a pumpkin sesame cracker recipe, it occurred to me that, with pumpkin season a couple months away, I should come up with something a little more summery to go with sesame. This cracker pairs fresh zucchini, onions, and tomatoes with organic flax, sunflower, millet, and sesame, cumin, and brava sea salt from generous fellow market vendor Jane Gregg of Spanish Food Works. I’ve been looking for a cracker to use my beloved Egyptian Walking Onion, which creates small bulblets at the top of the stalk (not underground, like most onions), and this was the one.  In late spring, the plant is glorious and alien (see photo below)– by now, the bulblets have made the plants so top-heavy that their dry brown stalks lay on their side, seeming to nap on hot August Days. 

The resulting cracker is more subtle than the vegan three seed pesto cracker I have been making the past few weeks, meaning that it could be good to eat with a variety of bean or pepper dips.

Ingredients:
organic zucchini (Whisper Hill Farm), organic millet, organic flax seeds, organic raw sunflower seeds, organic sesame seeds, egyptian walking onions, cherry tomatoes, filtered water, organic extra virgin olive oil, brava blend sea salt (Spanish Food Works), lemon juice, organic cumin

mexicali green bean crackers

With the spinach season waning for my local source (Broadhead Mountain Farm) and most other farms in the area, I set to work finding a replacement for tangy three seed spinach crackers, which seemed popular at market these past two Saturdays. What green vegetable could I transform into something crunchy, savory, and snackable? 

Our garden had the answer. Back in mid-March, when no one in their right mind would plant summer crops without some kind of row cover, my husband and his visiting father dutifully heeded my suggestion to go make themselves useful in the yard.  When he told me he planted peas and bush beans, I rolled my eyes? “Beans? Seriously? It’s way too early.” Scoff I did, and those few little seedlings struggled sadly as if to substantiate my skepticism. But now, three months later, they are going gangbusters. And in perfect garden irony, volunteer cilantro thrived temptingly right next to the tomato plants that we still a month from fruiting to salsa satisfaction. Every year, I bemoan the fact that by the time tomatoes are ripe, the cool-loving cilantro has bolted, set seed, and become bitter enough to ruin any attempt at salsa.  So I enjoy it when I can, making cilantro bean dips and salad dressings throughout the spring. Thus, in the garden, the inspiration for this new cracker was born, and I like how thin and crisp they can get if I keep a watchful eye to prevent burning!

I jokingly called this the Seedy Mexican Cracker around the house (it’s like two bad racial jokes in one!), but thankfully one of my farmers market customers offered an alternative that allowed me to re-name version 2.0. By weight, they are mostly fresh green beans and golden flax seeds, but the cumin and cilantro shine through nicely without overpowering. Next time, I might add some sun-dried tomatoes (we still have some from last year’s garden) for some specks of color.

p.s. Props to Southern Exposure Seed Exchange for selling a Provider Bush Bean that can survive planting in a wet chilly spring. Here’s to good genetics!

Ingredients: homegrown green beans, organic flax seeds, organic sunflower seeds, organic pumpkin seeds, organic seedless raisins, extra virgin olive oil, homegrown onions, sun-dried tomatoes, fresh cilantro, sea salt, organic cumin, organic garlic powder, organic orange extract.

tangy spinach crackers

Last Monday, I helped the PB&J Fund wrap up the semester’s Chef-in-Training program, working alongside Chef Harrison of Brookville Restaurant.  The challenge to the two teams of middle-schoolers was right up my alley: “Here is what is available from farms locally right now. Make a meal.” Spread on their prep tables were:

  • 3-4 pounds of fresh chicken drumsticks and thighs from Timbercreek Organics
  • a quart of fresh strawberries
  • a big bag of fresh Red Russian kale (baby leaves)
  • asparagus
  • a gigantic bunch of fresh tarragon

I was shocked at how quickly the two teams plunged in and rolled up their sleeves, leaving Chef Harrison, the PB&J staff, and myself to mill around for a while, making observational comments (kinda lame ones, in my case) and offering minimal suggestions as a sous chef and dishwasher. I won’t bore you with the menu details, but they definitely deserve some kudos for creativity and speed!

 

As I walked home with a little of the leftover tarragon in my pocket, I wondered what the heck I was going to do with it, excited by a little kitchen challenge of my own. Somehow, I had gotten through life thus far never growing or cooking with tarragon, and I was a little at a loss for what to combine it with. So… (insert “doodily-oop doodily-oop doodily oop” fast forward time warp a la Wayne’s World here), I researched online and played around with a test batch of crackers, adding some curry, anise, and a little sweetness from currants to my standard base of sunflower seeds, flax, and spinach. I really like the result, and might be experimenting more with tarragon!

Each bag contains two servings of 1.5 by 1.5 inch crackers, which are a good source of Vitamin K, Manganese, and Magnesium, with only have 2 grams of sugars (from the raisins) per serving.

Ingredients:
organic golden flax, organic millet, local organic spinach, organic pumpkin seeds, filtered water, organic raisins, organic extra virgin olive oil, raw apple cider vinegar, fresh ginger, sea salt, locally grown tarragon (Planet Earth Diversified), organic curry, organic anise seed

 

Millet & Fig Crackers with Rosemary

These crackers were inspired by the Millet Crackers featured in Ruth Yaron’s Super Baby Food (page 509). As I gushed in my recent book review, I adore the book’s simple, practical language, and brief, to-the-point recipes. Of course, this recipe absolutely fails to uphold the simplicity principle, as her recipe instructions are a mere three and a half lines while mine are at least, um, well, just see for yourself. Crackers are a fickle art; what can I say? In any case, I found this to be a successful experiment in adding essential fatty acids, protein, salt, and sweet without crystalline or liquid sweeteners, nuts, or gluten. A groggy post-nap Fionn gobbled several after sneaking them from the still-warm cookie sheet on top of the oven. Enjoy (and thanks, Ruth)!

Millet & Fig Crackers with Rosemary
Serves 16
A crunchy, sweet, nutty cracker with pepitas, figs, and rosemary.
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
92 calories
12 g
8 g
4 g
2 g
2 g
29 g
76 g
1 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
29g
Servings
16
Amount Per Serving
Calories 92
Calories from Fat 35
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
6%
Saturated Fat 2g
10%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 8mg
3%
Sodium 76mg
3%
Total Carbohydrates 12g
4%
Dietary Fiber 2g
8%
Sugars 1g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A
2%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
1%
Iron
3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup raw millet
  2. 3/4 cup pepitas
  3. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  4. 1/2 cup hot water
  5. 4 dried figs
  6. 4 tablespoons butter
  7. 2 teaspoons dried rosemary
Instructions
  1. Remove any stem pieces from dried figs and cut each in half. Place the halves in a glass or metal measuring cup and add 1/2 cup hot water. Add the butter so it can melt. Set aside for at least 10 minutes.
  2. Grind millet and pepitas in a blender (I use a Nutribullet) until a coarse powder consistency. Place this powder in a medium bowl and add the salt. Then crush the dried rosemary with your hands as you add it to the bowl, stirring everything until thoroughly combined.
  3. Blend the fig/water/butter mixture in a blender until the figs are pretty well blended (some small chunks are okay, but nothing larger than a pea).
  4. Combine the fig slurry with the dry ingredients, stirring thoroughly until the dough is a thick and just a little sticky. With oiled hands, roll into a two equally-sized firm balls, then flatten them to about 1 inch thick.
  5. Put them them back in the bowl, cover with a cloth, and let chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350F.
  6. Roll out a large sheet of parchment paper (at least 2 feet long) and place one of the dough balls in the center. Fold the parchment over the ball and then continue to roll it out to about 1/8 inch thick. Trim off jagged edges and score the rolled dough into 1 by 2 inch rectangles. Delicately move this sheet over to a cookie sheet.
  7. Add the trimmed dough to the second ball and repeat step 7. For any additional jagged edges, you can flatten then into cracker pieces with your hands or roll them into balls and let your kiddo taste-test them.
  8. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, take the crackers out of the oven and spread them out on the sheet, flipping each over to make sure they cook evenly. Turn off the oven and put the cookie sheets back in the oven, setting a timer for 5 minutes. Check them at this point, removing all the crackers except those that still seem too soft in the middle, putting them back in the warm oven for up to 5 additional minutes.
  9. Let them cool completely before storing in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. This recipe will yield about 80 1 by 2 inch crackers. I estimate a toddler serving to be about 5 crackers.
beta
calories
92
fat
4g
protein
2g
carbs
12g
more
Adapted from Millet Crackers from Super Baby Food (p. 509)
https://goodphytefoods.com/

Savory Spinach & Seed Crackers

For the second day of this week’s snack duty, I was infected with both a premature preoccupation with St. Patrick’s Day and a craving for greenness. I can only chalk these urges up to cumulative Vitamin D deficiency. Thus, spinach and shamrocks were nonnegotiable. In researching other spinach crackers, I was disappointed with the dull spectrum of greens characterizing the final products, so I tried a couple tricks- blanching the spinach (which sort of “locks in” nutrients and mitigates color fade by stopping enzymatic action) and combining sunflower seeds with a tiny bit of baking soda, which leverages the same reaction as the Oscar the Grouch Cookies.

"Raw" shamrocks, before baking
“Raw” shamrocks, before baking

Since the Butterfly Beet Crackers made previously this week were a little sweet (but not sweet enough, actually, since I think kids expecting a butterfly shaped cookie felt duped), I risked full-on savory with these shamrocks, playing with cumin and paprika. Olive oil is the only thing making these nonpaleo, technically, so the purists out there can sub lard or coconut oil. Of course, they are much easier to make into squares or triangles (which makes them look like chips), so I would only go the shamrock route if you have plenty of time and an acute need to woo an Irishman. Feel free to adjust the spices and use some different herbs to suit your (or your favorite Irishperson’s) fancy.

Savory Spinach & Seed Crackers
Serves 20
A deep green, grain-free cracker that pairs well with fresh salsa or a creamy cheese dip. Packed with spinach and essential fatty acids.
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108 calories
5 g
0 g
9 g
3 g
1 g
33 g
220 g
1 g
0 g
8 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
33g
Servings
20
Amount Per Serving
Calories 108
Calories from Fat 78
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 9g
14%
Saturated Fat 1g
5%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 5g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 220mg
9%
Total Carbohydrates 5g
2%
Dietary Fiber 3g
14%
Sugars 1g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
22%
Vitamin C
8%
Calcium
4%
Iron
6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3/4 cup ground golden flax seed
  2. 1 cup sunflower seeds
  3. 1/4 cup chia seeds
  4. 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  5. 1/4 teaspoon cumin powder
  6. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  7. 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  8. 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  9. 4 tablespoons olive oil
  10. 8 ounces fresh spinach leaves (about 8 cups coarsely chopped). You can also use 1+ cup frozen spinach, as it is already blanched. You want to end up with 1 cup pureed spinach.
  11. 1/2 peeled orange
Instructions
  1. Combine sunflower seeds, flax seeds in a food processor (I used a Nutribullet) until crumbly but not super fine. Put the contents into a medium bowl, and set aside the food processor as you will use it again and don't need to clean it out.
  2. Add garlic powder, cumin, smoked paprika, garlic powder, salt, and baking soda to the ground seeds, and whisk thoroughly to combine.
  3. Add an inch of water to a steaming pot and put the fresh spinach in a steaming basket. It will look like a lot, but cook down. Turn the stove eye on to medium heat, add the lid, and let the spinach steam until just wilted and bright green, about 5 minutes. Do not let it turn to mush. As soon as it's hot, green, and wilted, remove the basket and plunge it into a bowl of ice water for 1 minute.
  4. Retrieve the cooked leaves from the water and put them in the food processor with the half of an orange and olive oil. Purée until very smooth.
  5. Add the green purée to the seed/spice mixture, using a little spatula to get it all out of the processor and off the blades.
  6. Combine thoroughly, kneading any remaining bits into the dough by hand, making sure to work in any clumps of seeds. You want a thick ball of dough, so only add 1 teaspoon or so of water (preferably the water remaining from the steaming) if necessary.
  7. Divide dough in half and shape each into a ball. Place both balls on a large sheet of parchment paper (big enough to cover a cookie sheet) and flatten each into 1 inch-thick square. You may find it helpful to refrigerate for 30 minutes to allow dough to firm up before rolling. Once dough has chilled, heat oven to 350°F.
  8. Working with one ball at a time, roll out one ball of dough on the parchment paper to 1/8-inch thickness (but no thinner!) and, using a knife or pizza wheel, cut into whatever shape you like, as long as it's consistent. Squares or triangles would work fine, but I used a shamrock cookie cutter for the sake of St. Patrick's Day, which required using a spatula to transfer to another lined sheet. Uniformity is important to assure even baking, so just make sure each baking sheet contains only squares, or only shamrocks, etc.
  9. Once cut, separate the pieces on the parchment-lined baking sheet so that they are at least 1/2 inch apart.
  10. Bake for 10-12 minutes and turn the oven off. Flip the pieces upside down on the sheet so that the bottoms don't brown too much, and return to the warm oven for another 8-10 minutes until they are crisp but not browning. Remove from oven and cool completely. Store in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. Makes about 75-80 1.5 by 1.5 inch crackers, approximately 4-5 cups.
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calories
108
fat
9g
protein
3g
carbs
5g
more
https://goodphytefoods.com/
#paleo #sugarfree #grainfree#nutfree #beets #omega3s

Butterfly Beet Crackers

Ay caramba! This week, I am on snack-duty for my son’s class at The International School of Charlottesville, so I am on task to make three different, veggie-based snacks that will only gross out a small minority of the 12 toddler group (mostly boys). The teachers gave me a heads up that the learning theme would be shapes and colors, which served as a good excuse to use my motley collection of cookie cutters. As I procrastinated the challenge of a green snack, I decided that I wasn’t quite through with the beet theme of Valentine’s Day, and modified the savory Rosemary & Beet Crackers with some dates and warming spices, and used a butterfly shape. Honestly, I recommend sticking with a straight-up square version, as transferring the cut butterflies from the sheet of dough to the prepared cookie sheet is not only time consuming, but left me feeling like a cruel lepidopterist. Stretched, distorted wings and whatnot. Nevertheless, the flutter (one among several names for a group of butterflies, apparently) turned out pretty well, and are be great spread with a little goat cheese. That reminds me, Caromont Farm will be among my first stops when City Market opens for the season next month, as my freezer stash of their goat cheese is waning!

Nervous that the flutter might feel a little naked, I whipped up a curry dip with some black eyed peas, coconut milk, and a little honey, at the last minute before leaving for school on Monday. This was apparently was a good decision, according to the teachers, and I turned the leftovers into a salad dressing for my post-workout lunch (sloppy fried eggs and kale that stuck to the dirty iron skillet that I can never seem to keep seasoned properly).

Butterfly Beet Crackers
Serves 20
A beautifully magenta grain-free beet cracker sweetened with dates and warm spices. Essential fats come from sunflower and flax seeds.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
20 min
132 calories
11 g
0 g
9 g
4 g
1 g
40 g
128 g
6 g
0 g
8 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
40g
Servings
20
Amount Per Serving
Calories 132
Calories from Fat 76
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 9g
14%
Saturated Fat 1g
7%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 6g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 128mg
5%
Total Carbohydrates 11g
4%
Dietary Fiber 4g
17%
Sugars 6g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
4%
Iron
6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/4 cup steamed chopped beets
  2. 6 tablespoons water remaining from steaming beets
  3. 6 Medjool dates, pitted and halved
  4. 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  5. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  6. 1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted
  7. 1 cup golden flax seed
  8. 1 1/2 cups sunflower seeds
  9. 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  10. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  11. 1/2 teaspoon cloves
  12. 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  13. 1 teaspoon sea salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Soak your dates in the beet water (which should be a deep magenta) in a measuring cup for at least 10 minutes.
  3. In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the sunflower seeds and flax seeds. Pulse until a coarse meal forms.
  4. Add the spices and salt. Pulse until everything is a fine meal. Remove mixture and place into a medium sized bowl. Do not wash the processor bowl.
  5. Add the drained beets and soaked dates (with the liquid) to the to the food processor, along with the apple cider vinegar and melted coconut oil to the food processor. Process until the beets and dates are pretty thoroughly pureed.
  6. Use a spatula to scoop out the beet mixture, adding it to the bowl of dry ingredients. Stir until everything is combined, and a ball of dough begins to form.
  7. Pat the dough into a rectangular shape on a large piece of parchment paper. Top with another sheet of parchment paper and roll to about 1/8-inch thick rectangular shapes. Transfer the dough, parchment paper and all, to a baking sheet. Remove the top piece of parchment. Trim any jagged edges off with a knife or pizza cutter. Using the knife or pizza cutter, score the dough into cracker shapes, or whatever cookie cutter you have that doesn’t have any fine points that would inevitably lead to premature cracker breakage. Clearly, my preference is butterflies.
  8. Bake for 15 minutes until firm to the touch and light brown around the edges. Remove the pan from the oven and turn the oven off. Separate the crackers along the pre-cut lines and space them out a little bit on the baking sheet so the air can circulate around them. Place the pan back in the oven for 5 minutes. This step helps to crisp up the crackers a little more. After 5 minutes, remove the crackers from the oven and cool completely, for at least three hours. Crackers will continue to crisp up as they cool. Store in an airtight container once cooled.
Notes
  1. Yield will vary depending on the size you cut your crackers. If you opt for squares rather than using a cookie cutter, 1.5 x 1.5 inch squares will yield 75-80 crackers. Nutritional information assumes a serving of about 4 square crackers.
beta
calories
132
fat
9g
protein
4g
carbs
11g
more
Adapted from 'Love Train' Beet & Rosemary Crackers
https://goodphytefoods.com/

‘Love Train’ Beet & Rosemary Crackers

Remember those flimsy baseball card-sized paper valentines kids used to bring to everyone in your elementary school class out of obligatory, parent-enforced egalitarianism? In fact, do you remember Lisa Simpson’s regrettable decision to give Ralph Wiggum an “I Choo-Choo Choose You” card? If not, here is a 5 second clip on YouTube that was obviously recorded by someone standing in front of their television screen. Ah, the 90s!

In keeping with the Valentine’s Day theme this week, I wanted to use beets in a more savory finger-friendly context than the might-as-well-be-cupcakes ‘Love Bites’ Beet Muffins I posted a few days ago. Inspired by Daily Bites’ Beet & Rosemary crackers, I gladly nabbed some sprigs from our monster rosemary bush and played around with a nut-free version that also beefed up the beet content. Consequently, the result is darker in color and rich in sunflower and flax seed goodness. It’s grain and sweetener free, and would pair well with hummus or any dip that your little one fancies. You could use coconut oil instead of olive oil if you want a purely paleo version.

I had recently acquired a few new cookie cutters from a thrift store, so made both regaular rectangular crackers with this recipe as well as some choo-choos, just to see if it made a difference in toddler-receptivity. The recipe below is the simpler, standard rectangle version. You’re welcome!

Of course, without the train, you’ll need to make a new name for them, like “Flamingo Biscuits,” or “Vampire Blood Crackers,” or “Purple Princess Crackers,” depending on the interests of your little one at the moment.

 

'Love Train' Beet and Rosemary Crackers
Yields 20
This recipe yields about 80 1 inch by 1.5 inch crackers.
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Prep Time
25 min
Cook Time
15 min
Prep Time
25 min
Cook Time
15 min
110 calories
6 g
0 g
9 g
4 g
1 g
29 g
185 g
1 g
0 g
8 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
29g
Yields
20
Amount Per Serving
Calories 110
Calories from Fat 76
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 9g
14%
Saturated Fat 1g
5%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 6g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 185mg
8%
Total Carbohydrates 6g
2%
Dietary Fiber 4g
14%
Sugars 1g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
3%
Iron
5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup steamed chopped beets
  2. 4 tablespoons water remaining from steaming beets
  3. 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  4. 1 tablespoon olive oil
  5. 1 cup golden flax seed
  6. 1 1/2 cups sunflower seeds
  7. 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
  8. 1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic powder (optional)
  9. 1 teaspoon sea salt (fine)
  10. 1 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
  11. 1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt (for decorating)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the sunflower seeds and flax seeds. Pulse until a coarse meal forms.
  3. Add the rosemary, garlic powder, pepper, and salt. Pulse until everything is a fine meal. Remove mixture and place into a medium sized bowl. Do not wash the processor bowl.
  4. Drain the beets, reserving any liquid, which should be a deep magenta. Add the drained beets
  5. the to the food processor, along with the 4 tablespoons of the reserved beet cooking liquid, apple cider vinegar, and olive oil to the food processor. Process until the beets are pretty thoroughly pureed.
  6. Use a spatula to scoop out the beet mixture, adding it to the bowl of dry ingredients. Stir until everything is combined, and a ball of dough begins to form.
  7. Pat the dough into a rectangular shape on a large piece of parchment paper, using generously oiled hands. Top with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out to about 1/8-inch thick rectangular shape. Transfer the dough, parchment paper and all, to a baking sheet. Remove the top piece of parchment and sprinkle a tiny bit of coarse sea salt on top (if salt's your fancy). Trim any jagged edges off with a knife or pizza cutter and save it for another round of rolling. Using the knife or pizza cutter, score the dough into cracker shapes, depending on whether you prefer a square or rectangle.
  8. Bake for 15 minutes until firm to the touch and light brown around the edges. Remove the pan from the oven and turn the oven off. Separate the crackers along the pre-cut lines and space them out a little bit on the baking sheet so the air can circulate around them. Place the pan back in the hot oven for 5 minutes (longer if, like me, you only managed to roll them to somewhere between 1/8 and 1/4 inch). This step helps to crisp up the crackers a little more.
  9. After 5 minutes, remove the crackers from the oven and cool completely. I wait at least a couple hours and preferably overnight just to be safe.Crackers will continue to crisp up as they cool.
  10. Store in an airtight container after they are completely cooled.
Notes
  1. Nutritional information assumes a toddler serving of about 4 crackers.
Adapted from Daily Bites Blog
beta
calories
110
fat
9g
protein
4g
carbs
6g
more
Adapted from Daily Bites Blog
https://goodphytefoods.com/

Sweet Potato Sesame Sticks

Convinced that those addictive sesame sticks in the bulk bins can’t be thaaaat hard to make (the ingredients are simple), I tried my hand at a whole wheat version from Serious Eats, trying to emulate the real thing. I subbed beet water (the magenta liquid left over from steaming beets) for the water, and added cayenne.

They were good, and Fionn loved them, but I needed to kick them up a notch: they needed more vegetable content, more seed fat/fiber. So I made this grain-free, paleo version with sweet potato. I look forward to making versions with other pureed vegetables. NOTE: Cumin is KEY!

Sweet Potato Sesame Sticks
Yields 16
Savory, crunchy, and full of omega 3s and beta carotene.
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141 calories
7 g
0 g
12 g
4 g
1 g
31 g
231 g
1 g
0 g
10 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
31g
Yields
16
Amount Per Serving
Calories 141
Calories from Fat 99
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 12g
18%
Saturated Fat 1g
7%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 7g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 231mg
10%
Total Carbohydrates 7g
2%
Dietary Fiber 5g
19%
Sugars 1g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
24%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
8%
Iron
9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/4 cup ground golden flax seed
  2. 1/2 cup toasted sesame seeds
  3. 2 tablespoons hemp seeds
  4. 1/4 teaspoon dried turmeric
  5. 1/4 teaspoon cumin powder
  6. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  7. 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  8. 4 tablespoons sesame oil
  9. 1 cup puréed sweet potato or pumpkin
Instructions
  1. Combine sesame seeds, hemp seeds,ground flax, turmeric, garlic powder, cumin, and salt in a medium bowl and whisk thoroughly to combine.
  2. In a small bowl, combine pureed sweet potato/pumpkin and oil. Stir these wet ingredients into dry ingredients. Combine thoroughly, kneading any remaining bits into the dough by hand. If too dry, add a teaspoon or so of water.
  3. Divide dough in half and shape each into a ball. Place both balls on a large sheet of parchment paper (big enough to cover a cookie sheet) and flatten each into 1 inch-thick square. You may find it helpful to refrigerate for 30 minutes to allow dough to firm up before rolling. Once dough has chilled, heat oven to 350°F.
  4. Working with one ball at a time, roll out one ball of dough on the parchment paper to 1/8-inch thickness and, using a knife or pizza wheel, cut into small rectangles (I made mine approximately 1/4-inch by 1-inch, but you can go with a narrower rectangle more akin to the store-bought version). Uniformity is important to assure even baking.
  5. Once cut, separate the pieces on the parchment-lined baking sheet so that they are at least 1/2 inch apart.
  6. Bake for 10 minutes, then flip the pieces around on the sheet so that the bottoms don't brown. Continue baking for 8 minutes more, until sticks are crisp but not browning. Remove from oven and cool completely before storing in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. Yields 4 cups, or about 150 1 x 1.5 inch crackers.
beta
calories
141
fat
12g
protein
4g
carbs
7g
more
https://goodphytefoods.com/